Jamie Foxx Calls Spike Lee’s ‘Django’ Comments ‘Irresponsible’

0

*”Django Unchained” starring Jamie Foxx opened stateside back in December on Christmas Day.

Now, the Quentin Tarantion written and directed film, which has become a hornet’s next of controversy, is opening across the pond  this weekend in Europe.

Foxx sat down with The Guardian’s Xan Brooks for an insightful and interesting interview that covered the actor’s career history, his upbringing in Texas, his beloved grandmother and of corse, “Django Unchained” and its critics, most notably Spike Lee.

Yes, Spike’s mouth has kept somebody’s foot up his arse ever since he declared that “Django” wasn’t worth his time seeing  and as he put it, “was disrespectful to my ancestors.”

We think you’ll be interested in Jamie’s response to Spike and everything else he has to say.

In recent weeks Django has faced criticism for its use of racist language and its cavalier treatment of explosive material. Director Spike Lee claims the film is “disrespectful to my ancestors” and has refused to see the thing on principle. “American slavery,” he later tweeted, “was not a Sergio Leone spaghetti western.” Implicit in his comments is the sense that this is somehow not Tarantino’s tale to tell.

Foxx has his phone in his hand and his cap on his head, the peak twisted off-centre so that it points to two-o’clock. I’m barely through the door when he’s returning fire, defending the film for all that he’s worth. “The question for me is: where’s Spike Lee coming from?” he says. “He didn’t like Whoopi Goldberg, he doesn’t like Tyler Perry, he doesn’t like anybody, I think he’s sort of run his course. I mean, I respect Spike, he’s a fantastic director. But he gets a little shady when he’s taking shots at his colleagues without looking at the work. To me, that’s irresponsible.”

Besides, he adds, the history of entertainment is littered with white guys who told black stories, and white singers who sang black songs. Sometimes that’s good and sometimes it’s bad. “But you got to look at the individual cases. When Pat Boone covered Little Richard, you think, ‘Huh?’, he’s got no affinity for it. Good Golly Miss Molly? I don’t think so. But you can’t tell me that Eminem ain’t hot ‘cos he’s white or that Elvis Presley isn’t a bad motherf**ker, or that Quentin Tarantino can’t do whatever he likes, ‘cos damn straight he can.”

You can read the rest of what Jamie Foxx has to say at The Guardian.

spike lee

  

Share.

Comments are closed.